Coffee for French press: Method and how much coffee to grind

This article will cover how to grind your coffee correctly for French press and how much coffee you will need to use.

Bodum Chambord French Press Coffee and Tea Maker

What we will cover in this article:

  1. Can you use regular ground coffee in a French press?
  2. How To Grind Coffee For A French Press
  3. Is Coffee From A French Press Better?
  4. What Types Of Coffee Beans Should I Use With A French Press?
  5. How Much Coffee Do I Need To Add To A French Press?

If you are looking for a different coffee experience, you might consider using a French press. This device gives you manual control over the brewing process and also allows access to flavors you might not get from other brewing methods. But what is the best coffee for the French press? This article will review the specifics for choosing coffees for French presses in terms of their roasts, textures, and amounts. With this French press information, you can get a better idea of how to use your French press and the most out coffees brewed with one.

Can You Use Regular Ground Coffee In A French Press?

The short answer to this French press question is no — and the reasons have to do with the French press’s design. This device consists of a beaker component and a plunger/metal mesh component that fits snugly inside the beaker.

This metal mesh component is used to filter liquid coffee from coffee grounds after a specified brewing time, usually after about four minutes.

The coffee grounds are placed inside the beaker, and hot water is poured inside as well. The mixture is allowed to brew, with the plunger in the raised position.

Once the brewing is complete, the plunger is pushed or “pressed” down to separate the coffee grounds from the liquid coffee brew. At the top of the beaker, the brew is then poured out of the French press, and the coffee is ready to drink.

You can not use regular coffee grounds because the holes in the wire mesh filter are larger than regular paper filters or wired metal “coffee drippers.” If you use regular ground coffee in a French press, most of the grounds will pass through the mesh.

The same goes for coffees ground for making espresso. Espresso grounds are typically much finer than even regular coffee grounds and will not be filtered adequately in a French press.

In addition to this, it might be physically harder to press down the finer grains of regular ground coffee in a French press.

How To Grind Coffee For A French Press

To grind the coffee for a French press, you should follow the following steps:

  1. First of all, use whole coffee beans that have been roasted within 2-3 weeks of preparing your coffee. This should ensure the optimal freshness of your coffee when brewed.
  2. Next, place your beans in a coffee grinder.
  3. Grind the coffee beans until they are coarsely but evenly ground, about the size of Kosher salt grains or medium-fine sea salt grains. The largest of these grains should be about 3 or 4 millimeters.
  4. You may want to press down on the grinder button in a “pulse” fashion to check to see if the grounds are the right size. The grounds may be uneven in size once ground, but this is all right.
  5. Once the grinding is completed, measure out the amount of ground coffee beans you want to use (a guide for measurement is below).
  6. Finally, place the grinds in the French press beaker.

Is Coffee From A French Press Better?

This is a very subjective question, but those who use French presses say that the brewing process and rough filtering allow for more flavors and oils to pass into your completed coffee cup — more so than that from paper or wire mesh “drip” filters.

Those who use French presses also say that the coarser grounds prevent the coffee from being over-extracted — that is, brewed to the point of tasting bitter, hollow, or not having much flavor at all. In their opinion, French presses give coffees a full-bodied flavor that allows for natural oils to filter through and flavor the coffee.

A few coffee grounds (or more) will filter through a French press mesh to your cup in many cases. This is entirely normal, however, and should not be seen as problematic.

If the coffee has enough grounds passing through the mesh so that the brew is undrinkable, though, consider grinding your coffee beans in a coarser fashion.

Cafe Du Chateau French Press Coffee Maker (34 oz):

* 4 Level Filtration System.
* 304 Grade Stainless Steel French Press.
* Rust and corrosion-resistant.
* Borosilicate Glass Carafe.
* Included is a brewing guide.
* Lifetime Replacement Policy.

View further details here on Amazon:
Cafe Du Chateau French Press Coffee Maker

What Types Of Coffee Beans Should I Use With A French Press?

Generally, most people who use French presses use a medium to dark roasted coffees. This is because the darker roasts are likelier to have more bittersweet, caramelized, roasted flavors, ones that can be expressed through the coarse-grained brewing of a French press.

In addition to this, darker roasts are more likely to have their oils present – something that is not a characteristic of light roasts. This oil can be transferred to your cup of coffee, adding to the coffee’s flavor.

If you are using light roast coffee, you will likely have a cup of coffee with a brighter, more acidic flavor. This is not bad, per se, but is not as common among French press users.

You can also use any variety of coffee beans — from different regions or countries — to get a diverse French press coffee-drinking experience.

How Much Coffee Do I Need To Add To A French Press?

If you are making one cup of coffee, weigh out 15 grams of coarsely ground coffee and use 250 milliliters of water.

If you are making two cups of coffee, weigh out 30 grams of coarsely ground coffee and use 500 milliliters of water.

When you are making three cups of coffee, use 45 grams of coarsely ground coffee and 750 milliliters of water.

For each cup of coffee over 3 cups, use 15 grams more ground coffee (and 250 milliliters of water).

Secura French Press Coffee Maker, Stainless Steel Insulated Coffee Press:

* Made from top quality 18/10 stainless steel, both the interior and exterior.
* It is made to outlast other coffee makers.
* More efficient to retain heat comparing to single wall construction.
* 3-Layered stainless steel filter structure traps the smallest coffee grounds.
* Filter screen is easy to disassemble and clean.
* Cool touch handle and knob for comfortable and safe pouring.
* All the parts of this French coffee maker are DISHWASHER SAFE.

View further details here on Amazon:
Secura French Press Coffee Maker, Stainless Steel Insulated Coffee Press

Article Conclusion

Remember to pour out all of your brewed coffee from the French press once brewing is complete. You do not want to over-brew your coffee.

But besides that, using a French press can add additional flavors to your daily cup — those you might not get with a paper filter, percolator, or wire mesh filter. With just a little more time and effort, you can enjoy all the differences in flavor a French press has to offer.

Hopefully, you have found this article informative and interesting as I did when writing it. If you have found this page to help you, it would be awesome to share this page with me. (Thank you).

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